The Goyder Line
       
     
Holocaust Memorial
       
     
Waiting for Summer
       
     
The King of Bacon Street
       
     
Seacliff
       
     
Four Against One
       
     
Windswept
       
     
Blue and White
       
     
Window Shopping
       
     
Crossing
       
     
Bondi Icebergs
       
     
The Local Watch
       
     
Tuscan Cypress
       
     
Duomo
       
     
Rue St Dominque
       
     
Through the Bars
       
     
Natural Light
       
     
Manly Surf
       
     
The Goyder Line
       
     
The Goyder Line

The further North you travel within South Australia, the more arid and inhospitable the land becomes. Surveyed in the 1860s by then Surveyor-General of South Australia, George Goyder, the line separates land suitable for crops (averaging more than 10 inches of rain annually) from general grazing land. The Mid-North of South Australia has many deserted farmhouses like this, highlighting just how unyielding and precarious life on the land was, and still is living on and North of The Goyder Line.

Location: Burra-South Australia-Australia

Date: 2006 View in Store

Holocaust Memorial
       
     
Holocaust Memorial

The Holocaust Memorial in Berlin contains 2,711 concrete slabs arranged in a grid pattern on a sloping field. Each column represents approximately 1,100 Jewish deaths in World War 2. Walking amongst the uneven slabs, one feels claustrophobic and disorientated. Strategically positioned between the seat of power in the Reichstag and Hitler's bunker, it's a moving memorial to the millions who suffered unspeakable atrocities.

Location: Berlin-Germany

Date: 2015 View in Store

Waiting for Summer
       
     
Waiting for Summer

Situated on the Sussex south coast, Brighton is one of Britain's most popular coastal towns. The connection between London via railway was completed in 1841 and resulted in an influx of seaside day-trippers. As a consequence, the one time fishing village was transformed into a thriving holiday destination. Today Brighton is one of the UK's most colourful and cosmopolitan cities.

Location: Brighton-Sussex-UK

Date:2012 View in Store

The King of Bacon Street
       
     
The King of Bacon Street

Bacon Street runs off of Brick Lane in the East End of London. Charlie Burns was born in 1915 and lived here his entire life until passing away in 2012. He and his family were paper merchants; a business which began with Charlie's grandfather John in 1864. The business involved collecting waste paper from city offices to sell to Limehouse Paper Mills for recycling. After serving in North Africa in WW2, he returned to the family business intent of doing something positive for the war ravaged East End of London. With his brother Harry, he ran a thriving boxing club for the children of Bethnal Green. This mural was painted by Ben Snow and adorns the wall of his family business on Bacon Street.

Location: Spitalfields-London

Date: 2016 View in Store

Seacliff
       
     
Seacliff

Approximately 85% of the Australian population live within 50km of the coast and the beach has long occupied a special place in the national identity. Metropolitan Adelaide has approximately 60km of uncrowded, golden sandy beaches. During the summer months people flock to the beach to cool down, meet friends and just generally relax.

Location: Seacliff-Adelaide-South Australia-Australia

Date:2009 View in Store

Four Against One
       
     
Four Against One

Florence has dozens of world class highlights: The Duomo, Piazzale Michelangelo and the Uffizi Gallery to name a few. Far away from these popular sights, it also has wonderful cobbled backstreets and uncrowded alleyways. Aimlessly wandering these laneways is a rewarding experience. Small, local restaurants and quiet piazzas with charming fountains. Neighbours gossiping door-to-door. Tiny flower stalls and greengrocers. Best of all, as the the crowds stay on the well-worn tourist path, you have these experiences largely to yourself.

Location: Florence-Italy

Date: 2012 View in Store

Windswept
       
     
Windswept

The Normandy beach of Ouistreham and surrounds were the settings for the D-Day landings of the 4th June 1944. These days, the beaches are far removed from the scenes experienced of this bloody day. On this particular cold, windswept day in March, the beach was deserted except for 2 braves girls rugged up against the elements.  This winter scene is in stark contrast to the summer months where the owners of these beach huts flock to the coast in search of sunshine.

Location: Ouistreham-France

Date: 2005 View in Store

Blue and White
       
     
Blue and White

The beach in Nice curves around the Bay of Angels for about 4 kilometres and is almost entirely composed of smooth pebbles. Interspersed along this stretch of coastline are 15 private beach concessions. These private beaches are marked out and fenced off from the general public and have sun-lounges, umbrellas, towels and food and drink facilities. For those not willing or unable to afford 40 Euros for this privilege, there is plenty of free beach space available.

Location: Nice-Cote d'Azur-France

Date:2006 View in Store

Window Shopping
       
     
Window Shopping

Red Light Districts exist in most major cities in the world, however, Amsterdam's is probably the most famous. The Dutch pride themselves on their wholly liberal and tolerant attitude, and this follows with soft drugs and prostitution. Instead of criminalising these things the Dutch have chosen to regulate. Safety is paramount. In addition to preventing forced prostitution, the aim is an open and honest approach. Sex-workers here have their own union, police protection, frequent monitoring and testing and professional standards.

Location: Amsterdam-Netherlands

Date: 2007 View in Store

Crossing
       
     
Crossing

Copper was first discovered in Burra in 1845. South Australia was officially only 9 years old and this discovery helped kickstart the colony's spluttering economy. By 1851 Burra's reported population of 5,000 made it the largest inland settlement and 7th largest town in Australia. Until 1860, the mine was the largest metal mine in Australia but by 1877 this lode had been exhausted. The railway line reached Burra 7 years before the copper rush had ended. With the copper gone, it was only a matter of time before the railway and majority of townspeople disappeared too.

Location: Burra-South Australia-Australia

Date: 2014 View in Store

Bondi Icebergs
       
     
Bondi Icebergs

Every Sunday from May to September, the ocean pool at the southern end of Bondi Beach is packed with members of the Bondi Icebergs Swimming Club. The club's constitution drawn up in 1929 dictates that new members do their time whatever the weather or temperature during the winter season. This initiation includes swimming in the outdoor pool three Sundays every winter month, and more than 75 times over a five-year period. Then, and only then, will swimmers be granted the club’s coveted full membership.

Location: Sydney-New South Wales-Australia

Date: 2010 View in Store

The Local Watch
       
     
The Local Watch

Founded by The Moors in the 8th Century, Alfama is Lisbon's oldest district. It's a labyrinth of alleyways, compact archways and small cobbled terraces. The houses are outwardly derelict looking, yet ornately tiled with wrought iron balconies. As you progress further up the hill away from the Rio Tejo you find magnificent churches and viewpoints where Lisbon opens up beneath you.

Location: Lisbon-Portugal

Date: 2014 View in Store

Tuscan Cypress
       
     
Tuscan Cypress

The landscape of Val d’Orcia was redeveloped in the 14th and 15th centuries to reflect an idealised model of good governance and to create an aesthetically pleasing picture. The landscape’s distinctive aesthetics, flat chalk plains out of which rise almost conical hills with fortified settlements on top, inspired many artists. Their images have come to exemplify the beauty of well-managed Renaissance agricultural landscapes. 

Location: Pienza-Tuscany-Italy

Date: 2012 View in Store

Duomo
       
     
Duomo

The Cattedrale di Santa Maria del Fiore or "Cathedral of Saint Mary of the Flowers" is the main church of Florence, Italy. Il Duomo di Firenze, as it is ordinarily called, was begun in 1296 in the Gothic style with the design of Arnolfo di Cambio and completed structurally in 1436 with the dome engineered by Renaissance master Filippo Brunelleschi. The basilica is one of Italy's largest churches, and until development of new structural materials in the modern era, the dome was the largest in the world. It remains the largest brick dome ever constructed.

Location: Florence-Italy

Date: 2012 View in Store

Rue St Dominque
       
     
Rue St Dominque

In the last decade of the 19th Century, the iconic Eiffel Tower was the tallest man-made structure in the world. Viewed from Montmatre, the hillside arrondissement, it still dominates the Parisian skyline. From street level amongst the buildings, you regularly lose sight of it, until an occasional corner is turned and it towers impressively above you.

Location: Paris-France

Date: 2015 View in Store

Through the Bars
       
     
Through the Bars

Whilst the Berlin Wall separated the city above ground between 1961 and 1989, the underground U-Bahn network still spanned East & West. Three lines that began and ended in the West but transited through the East contained 16 stations. These stations became what is known as "ghost stations". To stop people getting on in the East to go to the West, these stations were manned with soldiers carrying machine guns. As trains approached these desolate, musty stations, the trains slowed, but never stopped. Barbed wire fences were installed to prevent any would-be escapees from East Berlin from accessing the track bed, and the electrically live third rail served as an additional and potentially lethal deterrent. An alarm was triggered if anyone breached one of the barriers. The signage was removed at the entrances, walkways were walled up and stairways were sealed with concrete slabs. 

Location: Alexanderplatz-Berlin-Germany

Date: 2015 View in Store

Natural Light
       
     
Natural Light

Nice Old Town, known locally as Le Vieux Nice, is a charming honeycomb of narrow streets, dotted with beautiful Baroque churches, vibrant squares, shops and restaurants. The pastel shades of the Old Town houses, often with their shutters drawn against the fierce summer light, bring reflections on a grander age of travel. From the second half of the 18th Century English aristocrats came to Nice to escape the chill, both seasonal and moral, of northern climes for the warm, welcoming air of the Mediterranean.

Location: Nice-Cote d'Azur-France

Date: 2010 View in Store

Manly Surf
       
     
Manly Surf

Australia is renowned as one of the world's premier surfing destinations. Its 25,000km of coastline is blessed with beach, reef and point breaks to challenge the most experienced surfers. Some of the world-class breaks include Cactus, Bells, Snapper Rocks & Ship Stern Bluff. There's also hundreds of city breaks, where you can easily head to after the working day has ended. Surfing in Australia is more than just a sport; it's a way of life for thousands.

Location: Sydney-New South Wales-Australia

Date: 2010 View in Store