Iceland

A metal sculpture of a Viking boat called Sun Voyager, Reykjavik, Iceland.
2008: Sólfar, or The Sun Voyager, is an impressive metal sculpture that resides on the edge of Faxaflói Bay in Reykjavik. Commissioned in 1986 for Reykjavik’s official 200th birthday, it was finally unveiled in 1990. It’s striking form appears to be that of a viking boat, however, artist Jón Gunnar Árnason described it as a dreamboat, or an “ode to the Sun.” He intended it to “convey the promise of undiscovered territory, a dream of hope, progress and freedom.”
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2008: Hljómalind can be broken down into two words: “hljóma” (sounds) and “lind” (fountain) and roughly translates into “a fountain of music”. This particular colourful organic cafe, was at one stage, Iceland’s only independent record store. At that time it was owned by Sigur Ros’ manager Kristinn Sæmundsson. Sigur Ros subsequently recorded and released a song titled Hljómalind in 2007.
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Colourful green corrugated house in Reykjavik, Iceland.
2006: The world’s northernmost capital city, Reykjavik, is compact in size but packs a vibrant, gritty looking punch. Swathes of the city are home to brightly coloured corrugated iron buildings that first appeared in the 1880s. The material was first introduced into Iceland at this time by way of trading sheep with the UK. The corrugated iron was weather sealed in zinc and provided exceptional shelter from the extreme Nordic climate. After a fire in 1915 damaged parts of the city but left metal-clad houses largely untouched, a bylaw was passed requiring a corrugated coating for all new houses built close together that remains today.
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Hallgrimskirkja church, Reykjavik, Iceland.
2006: One of the most distinctive landmarks in Reykjavik is Hallgrimskirkja church. The distinctive basalt design is meant to resemble the numerous lava flows found in Iceland’s natural landscape. Standing in front of the church is a statue of explorer Leif Erikson (970–1020). It was a gift from the United States in 1930 to commemorate the 1000th anniversary of Iceland’s parliament at Pingvellir in 930 AD.
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